Saturday, 31 January 2009

Teenage kicks

My daughter is now in France on the exchange trip. I got virtually tear-stained desperate texts on the first (Thursday) night.
"I'm scared. It's awful here. I love you so much now."
On Friday evening I got the news that my daughter's best friend, who was still in London, had called the school saying that there was a bomb. She then called the police to repeat the same warning. The police traced the call and caught her at a phone box near the school. Helicopters, two police vans, several police cars and sniffer dogs arrived. The whole operation cost over £100,000. 
Some of the pupils at this school, the Lycée francais in London, are diplomat's children. In fact the girl's sister is Madonna's daughter's best friend. A threat like that would be taken extremely seriously.
The entire school, almost 4000 children, were evacuated to a nearby park. This was done within 10 minutes. The children were told that there was a bomb warning. Some of the smaller children were cold, they had no time to pick up their coats. But nobody panicked. 
My daughter's best friend spent the day in prison and has been expelled. Her parents are mortified. Her father, who is Syrian, no doubt spent a few uncomfortable hours with the police. Their house was searched.
My teen messaged me on Friday from Facebook, so annoyed.
"I've been waiting for years for something like that to happen. Why didn't she do it while I was at school? Why did she do it while I was away?"
I think things must have improved on the exchange visit because I haven't heard from my teen since.
Update: the girl did the fake bomb message to avoid a history test that afternoon. Love it. Teenagers eh? 

9 comments:

  1. Teenage angst; we adults pretend that we understand when we don't have the foggiest.

    ReplyDelete
  2. It's odd how different things scare different people. What shall I choose, a week's holiday in France or being in the middle of a bomb scare? Let me just... weight this up for a while! Still, ML it shows how much you mean to her. She was more bothered by being away from you than she was over the prospect of being blown up.

    ReplyDelete
  3. It's odd how different things scare different people. What shall I choose, a week's holiday in France or being in the middle of a bomb scare? Let me just... weight this up for a while! Still, ML it shows how much you mean to her. She was more bothered by being away from you than she was over the prospect of being blown up.

    ReplyDelete
  4. If this is a true story than the girl and her parents desperately need reeducation and thearpy. They should work in the ghettoes for a while. I mean parents included!!
    I personally have had it with all those upper crust, spoiled do not good brats. Nothing has changed since the 70 ies when anti authoritarian education became the hit.
    These parents and kids have no and I mean absolute no social competence.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Ooh harsh.
    Actually this girl's parents are not rich, are hard working, and all 3 girl's share a bedroom. They are most certainly not spoilt.
    There are many spoilt kids at the school though but I wouldn't count them in that category.
    I also think this is all part of teenage experimentation.
    It has been shown in recent studies that the human brain doesn't really finish developing until the age of 25.
    And the risk assessment part of the brain is the last to mature.
    A stupid thing to do, but it's become more serious because of terrorism which is not these girl's fault.

    ReplyDelete
  6. the terrorism shit is wot made the prank so funny i reckon. sure its not her fault but she surely included that in her calculations probobally inspired by the whole war on terror hype. it was a great gag - wwell done whoever did it - make silly mistakes while u are young and can still recover from them - life is better 4 it. i was kicked out of skool when i was 16 for swearing on stage at a skool charity concert and it was the stupidest thing, but its just about scandal and creating situations that are out of control for no sensible reason except for the buzz of creating a situation - i dont regret wot i did.

    but wot i wanted to write about was going to france and missing my mum - i did that when i was 13 or so and for the first time i really understood my love for my mum - i was really groipped by this fear that anything could happen to her - she was being abused by my dad at the time, but i was thinking that wow she could get hit by a car or anything and i'd be hundreds of miles away and would never see her again. i understood how she felt about me going out at night and stuff too - i guess thats growing up innit

    ReplyDelete
  7. I was speaking to this woman who works with young offenders a few weeks back. She said that the understanding of consequences is one of the last things children/teenagers develop.

    ReplyDelete
  8. She was expelled?! Jesus, that's a bit harsh. In fact, I reckon if you expel a kid for something like that, then the terrorists have won.

    Your daughter's a bit feisty, isn't she? Crikey.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Bete,
    Expelled is a bit strong, you are right.
    Feisty? I blame the mother.

    ReplyDelete

Please leave a comment, it means I am not shouting into the void!